Do Muslim’s Respect Jesus?

Do Muslim’s Respect Jesus?

http://www.answeringmuslims.com Our Muslim friends often claim that Jesus is highly honored and respected in Islam. But then they tell us that Jesus’ message was corrupted (by Allah himself, along with others), that Jesus’ followers abandoned his teachings, and that we needed Muhammad to come along to accomplish what Jesus couldn’t accomplish. But this means that Jesus didn’t actually accomplish anything that lasted. How can Muslims say they respect Jesus when they portray him as a complete failure?

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Jesus Cares and Fully Understands

Jesus Truly Cares and Fully Understands Jesus cares
Along life’s journey, none of us can avoid worries, hardships, or heartache. When we’re hurt, discouraged, or grieving, we yearn for someone to understand what we’re going through. We may tell our troubles to friends or family, but sometimes they can’t fully understand. And although we may get some relief by telling them about our situation, we still feel a deep need in our heart.

At times like that, who can we turn to? We might think even the Lord Jesus can’t really understand. But He can! And we can be assured of this fact based on God’s Word.Today we’ll focus on a priceless verse in the Bible, Hebrews 2:17, with the notes in the New Testament Recovery Version. We’ll see that our dear Lord Jesus can genuinely understand and sympathize with us like no one else can. And He’s the only One who can meet our inner need.

Hebrews 2:17 says,

“Hence He should have been made like His brothers in all things that He might become a merciful and faithful High Priest in the things pertaining to God, to make propitiation for the sins of the people.”
Let’s look at three crucial phrases in this verse.

1. Made like His brothers in all things

What does it mean that Jesus was “made like His brothers in all things”? Note 1 in the New Testament Recovery Version says:

“The Son of God was made like us, His brothers, in that He partook of blood and flesh (v. 14). This was done for two purposes, one negative and the other positive. The negative purpose was to destroy for us the devil, who is in the flesh. The positive purpose is to be our merciful and faithful High Priest who has the human nature, that He may sympathize with us in all things.”
Hebrews 2:14 (referenced in the note) says,

“Since therefore the children have shared in blood and flesh, He also Himself in like manner partook of the same, that through death He might destroy him who has the might of death, that is, the devil.”
This verse tells us the Lord partook of blood and flesh so that through death He might destroy the devil. That was the negative purpose of His being made like us in all things.

But verse 17 speaks of the positive purpose for Jesus partaking of blood and flesh. This was so He could have the human nature. Since He possesses the human nature, Jesus can be our merciful and faithful High Priest who can sympathize with us in all the difficulties of human life. If Jesus didn’t have the human nature, how could He understand or sympathize with us human beings?

With this in mind, let’s consider the Lord’s life on earth.

Isaiah 53 is a great prophecy and revelation of Jesus in the Old Testament. It says that He would be a man of sorrows, acquainted with grief. From being placed in a lowly feeding trough at his birth to enduring a humiliating and agonizing death on the cross, Jesus experienced untold suffering throughout His entire life. He grew up in a poor carpenter’s home in Nazareth, not in a trouble-free environment. He knew firsthand what physical hunger, thirst, weariness, and poverty were. He knew from personal experience what it was to be rejected, misunderstood, mocked, and slandered.

Yet at the same time, the Gospels reveal that Jesus cared deeply for the human beings He came to live among and minister to. His heart was fully concerned for all the sinners He met. He healed the sick, cleansed lepers, and gave sight to the blind. He spoke tender words of compassion to those who were forlorn and miserable.

Jesus cared for every kind of person, no matter how vile; this caused the people who didn’t appreciate Him to belittle Him by calling Him a “friend of sinners.” But how wonderful for all of us that He is indeed a friend of sinners! Jesus understood and sympathized with people’s problems, sadness, and distress. This is the kind of man He was when He lived on earth.

Because Jesus was made like us in all things, and because of all He experienced as a man, He can understand anything we may be going through, no matter how terrible or distressing. We can be sure that whatever painful situation we’re in, He shares in our feelings, sympathizes with us, and cares for us.

Now we’ll look at the second important phrase in Hebrews 2:17.
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2. He might become a merciful and faithful High Priest
What do these words reveal about Jesus? Note 2 on High Priest explains:

“As the High Priest, Christ ministers God Himself and the riches of the divine life to us. As the God-man, He is more than fully qualified to be our High Priest. Here, merciful corresponds with His being a man; faithful corresponds with His being God.”
In the Old Testament, the high priest took care of God’s people, and Jesus is the fulfillment of this Old Testament picture. Jesus, our real High Priest, is both God and man. As a man made like us in all things, He’s merciful to us and able to understand us. We can come to Him and be assured that He sympathizes with us in our affliction.

What’s more, as God, Jesus is our faithful High Priest who ministers God Himself and the unlimited riches of the divine life into us. He faithfully ministers these divine riches to us to meet our need in our situation of suffering. We may not even know what we need, but our faithful High Priest knows. He ministers the riches of God into us to meet our need, whether it’s strength, love, hope, encouragement, endurance, or joy.

We come now to the third important phrase in this verse.

3. To make propitiation for the sins of the people
Maybe we feel like we can’t pour out what’s on our heart to Jesus because we’re afraid to come to Him. Perhaps we feel unworthy, or we’ve been away from Him for a while, or we’ve experienced failure in our Christian life. But we don’t need to stay far away from Him! The Lord made propitiation for our sins. Note 4 on propitiation says:

“Jesus made propitiation for our sins, thereby satisfying the demand of God’s righteousness and appeasing the relationship between God and us, that God may be peacefully gracious to us.”
It’s impossible for us to do anything to make our sinful situation right before God. But Jesus loved us to such an extent that He laid down His life for us. He resolved our problem of sin and met all the righteous demands of God through His death on the cross.

So if we’ve sinned, we need to repent—that is, turn back to God—and confess our sins to Him. When we turn to Him and confess our sins, we can enjoy His propitiation again and be forgiven and cleansed with His blood. This makes it possible for us to come to the Lord without fear.

Hebrews 2:17 is truly a marvelous verse! It shows us no matter what difficult situation we’re going through, we can be assured that Jesus understands us fully and sympathizes with us deeply.

How do we experience the sympathy and ministry of Jesus?

Now that we’ve looked at some verses and footnotes in the New Testament Recovery Version, let’s go on to see how we can practically come to the Lord Jesus to experience His sympathy and ministry:

We should first realize that the Lord isn’t far away from us or hard for us to reach. When we were saved, Christ as the life-giving Spirit came to live in our spirit. He’s so close and accessible in our spirit; we can come to Him at any time.
If our conscience makes us aware of any sins we’ve committed, we should confess them to remove any barrier between us and the Lord and be forgiven and washed in His blood. We can come to Him with confidence because He’s already made propitiation for our sins.
We come to the Lord by turning our hearts to Him from everything else and exercising our spirit in prayer. It really helps if we open our mouth and pray audibly to the Lord. By speaking to Him in prayer, we can pour out what’s on our heart into the listening and loving ear of Jesus.
Many of us can testify that we’ve experienced the sympathy and ministry of Jesus, our High Priest. In the midst of our woes, as we uttered what was on our heart to Him in prayer, we had the sense He was listening intently to us, and we were soothed by His sympathy and tender care. Though our outward situation didn’t necessarily change, we were encouraged and enlivened. Jesus not only sympathized with us but also ministered something of God into our being, meeting our deepest need. Words just can’t express how wonderful this is.

We hope you’re encouraged by the words in Hebrews 2:17 and the notes in the New Testament Recovery Version. No matter what we’re going through, we can come to the Lord in prayer. We never have to wonder whether Jesus can understand. He always does, and He can truly meet our need.

All verses and footnotes are quoted from the Holy Bible Recovery Version. You can order a free copy of the New Testament Recovery Version here.

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Jesus Truly Cares and Fully Understands

Jesus Truly Cares and Fully Understands
Jesus cares
Along life’s journey, none of us can avoid worries, hardships, or heartache. When we’re hurt, discouraged, or grieving, we yearn for someone to understand what we’re going through. We may tell our troubles to friends or family, but sometimes they can’t fully understand. And although we may get some relief by telling them about our situation, we still feel a deep need in our heart.

At times like that, who can we turn to? We might think even the Lord Jesus can’t really understand. But He can! And we can be assured of this fact based on God’s Word.Today we’ll focus on a priceless verse in the Bible, Hebrews 2:17, with the notes in the New Testament Recovery Version. We’ll see that our dear Lord Jesus can genuinely understand and sympathize with us like no one else can. And He’s the only One who can meet our inner need.

Hebrews 2:17 says,

“Hence He should have been made like His brothers in all things that He might become a merciful and faithful High Priest in the things pertaining to God, to make propitiation for the sins of the people.”
Let’s look at three crucial phrases in this verse.

  1. Made like His brothers in all things

What does it mean that Jesus was “made like His brothers in all things”? Note 1 in the New Testament Recovery Version says:

“The Son of God was made like us, His brothers, in that He partook of blood and flesh (v. 14). This was done for two purposes, one negative and the other positive. The negative purpose was to destroy for us the devil, who is in the flesh. The positive purpose is to be our merciful and faithful High Priest who has the human nature, that He may sympathize with us in all things.”
Hebrews 2:14 (referenced in the note) says,

“Since therefore the children have shared in blood and flesh, He also Himself in like manner partook of the same, that through death He might destroy him who has the might of death, that is, the devil.”
This verse tells us the Lord partook of blood and flesh so that through death He might destroy the devil. That was the negative purpose of His being made like us in all things.

But verse 17 speaks of the positive purpose for Jesus partaking of blood and flesh. This was so He could have the human nature. Since He possesses the human nature, Jesus can be our merciful and faithful High Priest who can sympathize with us in all the difficulties of human life. If Jesus didn’t have the human nature, how could He understand or sympathize with us human beings?

With this in mind, let’s consider the Lord’s life on earth.

Isaiah 53 is a great prophecy and revelation of Jesus in the Old Testament. It says that He would be a man of sorrows, acquainted with grief. From being placed in a lowly feeding trough at his birth to enduring a humiliating and agonizing death on the cross, Jesus experienced untold suffering throughout His entire life. He grew up in a poor carpenter’s home in Nazareth, not in a trouble-free environment. He knew firsthand what physical hunger, thirst, weariness, and poverty were. He knew from personal experience what it was to be rejected, misunderstood, mocked, and slandered.

Yet at the same time, the Gospels reveal that Jesus cared deeply for the human beings He came to live among and minister to. His heart was fully concerned for all the sinners He met. He healed the sick, cleansed lepers, and gave sight to the blind. He spoke tender words of compassion to those who were forlorn and miserable.

Jesus cared for every kind of person, no matter how vile; this caused the people who didn’t appreciate Him to belittle Him by calling Him a “friend of sinners.” But how wonderful for all of us that He is indeed a friend of sinners! Jesus understood and sympathized with people’s problems, sadness, and distress. This is the kind of man He was when He lived on earth.

Because Jesus was made like us in all things, and because of all He experienced as a man, He can understand anything we may be going through, no matter how terrible or distressing. We can be sure that whatever painful situation we’re in, He shares in our feelings, sympathizes with us, and cares for us.

Now we’ll look at the second important phrase in Hebrews 2:17.
Do you need help understanding the Bible?
Order a free study Bible that will help you to understand God’s Word.

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  1. He might become a merciful and faithful High Priest

What do these words reveal about Jesus? Note 2 on High Priest explains:

“As the High Priest, Christ ministers God Himself and the riches of the divine life to us. As the God-man, He is more than fully qualified to be our High Priest. Here, merciful corresponds with His being a man; faithful corresponds with His being God.”
In the Old Testament, the high priest took care of God’s people, and Jesus is the fulfillment of this Old Testament picture. Jesus, our real High Priest, is both God and man. As a man made like us in all things, He’s merciful to us and able to understand us. We can come to Him and be assured that He sympathizes with us in our affliction.

What’s more, as God, Jesus is our faithful High Priest who ministers God Himself and the unlimited riches of the divine life into us. He faithfully ministers these divine riches to us to meet our need in our situation of suffering. We may not even know what we need, but our faithful High Priest knows. He ministers the riches of God into us to meet our need, whether it’s strength, love, hope, encouragement, endurance, or joy.

We come now to the third important phrase in this verse.

  1. To make propitiation for the sins of the people

Maybe we feel like we can’t pour out what’s on our heart to Jesus because we’re afraid to come to Him. Perhaps we feel unworthy, or we’ve been away from Him for a while, or we’ve experienced failure in our Christian life. But we don’t need to stay far away from Him! The Lord made propitiation for our sins. Note 4 on propitiation says:

“Jesus made propitiation for our sins, thereby satisfying the demand of God’s righteousness and appeasing the relationship between God and us, that God may be peacefully gracious to us.”
It’s impossible for us to do anything to make our sinful situation right before God. But Jesus loved us to such an extent that He laid down His life for us. He resolved our problem of sin and met all the righteous demands of God through His death on the cross.

So if we’ve sinned, we need to repent—that is, turn back to God—and confess our sins to Him. When we turn to Him and confess our sins, we can enjoy His propitiation again and be forgiven and cleansed with His blood. This makes it possible for us to come to the Lord without fear.

Hebrews 2:17 is truly a marvelous verse! It shows us no matter what difficult situation we’re going through, we can be assured that Jesus understands us fully and sympathizes with us deeply.

How do we experience the sympathy and ministry of Jesus?

Now that we’ve looked at some verses and footnotes in the New Testament Recovery Version, let’s go on to see how we can practically come to the Lord Jesus to experience His sympathy and ministry:

We should first realize that the Lord isn’t far away from us or hard for us to reach. When we were saved, Christ as the life-giving Spirit came to live in our spirit. He’s so close and accessible in our spirit; we can come to Him at any time.
If our conscience makes us aware of any sins we’ve committed, we should confess them to remove any barrier between us and the Lord and be forgiven and washed in His blood. We can come to Him with confidence because He’s already made propitiation for our sins.
We come to the Lord by turning our hearts to Him from everything else and exercising our spirit in prayer. It really helps if we open our mouth and pray audibly to the Lord. By speaking to Him in prayer, we can pour out what’s on our heart into the listening and loving ear of Jesus.
Many of us can testify that we’ve experienced the sympathy and ministry of Jesus, our High Priest. In the midst of our woes, as we uttered what was on our heart to Him in prayer, we had the sense He was listening intently to us, and we were soothed by His sympathy and tender care. Though our outward situation didn’t necessarily change, we were encouraged and enlivened. Jesus not only sympathized with us but also ministered something of God into our being, meeting our deepest need. Words just can’t express how wonderful this is.

We hope you’re encouraged by the words in Hebrews 2:17 and the notes in the New Testament Recovery Version. No matter what we’re going through, we can come to the Lord in prayer. We never have to wonder whether Jesus can understand. He always does, and He can truly meet our need.

All verses and footnotes are quoted from the Holy Bible Recovery Version. You can order a free copy of the New Testament Recovery Version here.

Christians Stop Saying Jesus is The Son of The Living God Because it Provokes Muslims to Violence

https://www.frontpagemag.com/fpm/272398/christians-stop-saying-jesus-son-god-it-provokes-robert-spencer

Buried in the concluding paragraphs of a Christmas Eve Washington Times report about Muslims in Uganda forcing Christians to convert to Islam was the extraordinary revelation that in that country, Muslims now consider any public statement of the Christian Faith to be a calculated insult to Muslims, for which they can justifiably exact revenge. This is, or should be, sobering news for the comfortable Christians of the West who have made an idol out of “interfaith dialogue” and fastidiously avoid saying anything remotely critical about Islam, even as the Muslim persecution of Christians continues worldwide.

“In June,” the Times reported, “a group of Muslims attacked Christian preachers in eastern Uganda during a ‘crusade,’ where Christians publicly profess their faith and invite others to join. Muslims in the town accused the Christians of mocking Islam by publicly saying Jesus was the Son of God.”

In response, said Christian pastor Moses Saku, the Muslims became violent: “They became very angry and began throwing rocks at Christians, chanting ‘Allah akbar.’ Many Christians were injured during the incident.”

The Christians appealed to the Muslims to have respect for those of other faith; the Muslims responded with contempt. One Muslim, Abubakar Yusuf, declared: “We have now declared a jihad against them. We are not going to allow anybody to despise Islamic teachings at their church or crusade. We will seek revenge.”

How did the Christians “despise Islamic teachings”? By preaching aspects of Christianity, such as the divinity of Christ, that Islam denies. The Christians, knowing how delicate their situation was, would never have dreamed of actually saying something critical about Islam itself; but to the Muslims who heard them, just enunciating the tenets of their Christian faith was criticism enough. And they refused to stand for it.

A few years ago, when jihadis attacked AFDI’s Muhammad Art Exhibit and Cartoon Contest in Garland, Texas, some Christians castigated me for co-sponsoring and speaking at the event. They said that Pamela Geller and I, as co-organizers of the event, were being needlessly provocative, poking Muslims in the eye, goading them, etc.

These charitable and enlightened Christians said that Christians should instead be deferential to others’ religious sensibilities. At the time, I responded to these people by explaining that giving in to violent intimidation (our event was a response to the jihad murder of the Charlie Hebdo Muhammad cartoonists in Paris) would only encourage more violent intimidation, and that given the fact that Muslims frequently found even basic expressions of Christian faith to be “provocative,” they were effectively cutting the ground out from under themselves and their children, making it impossible for them to practice Christianity in the future.

These incidents in Uganda are proof that this was correct. In declaring jihad and stating that the Muslims were now on a quest for revenge, Abubakar Yusuf and the Muslims who agree with him are in effect saying that the public expression of the Christian Faith mocks Islam and despises Islamic teachings. Abubakar Yusuf’s announcement that the Muslims had “declared jihad” against the Christians and would “seek revenge” against them was tantamount to a declaration that the Christians must submit to the hegemony of the Muslims, not daring to practice their faith openly, but only in private, behind closed door, and at the sufferance of their Muslim overlords.

This is exactly the status that Islamic law prescribes for Christians in lands governed by Islamic law, and so it is clear that Abubakar Yusuf is no lone fanatic, but is enunciating what many Muslims in Uganda believe to be only right and proper.

The lesson is clear, and not just for Uganda. If the advice of the cosseted, suburban Western Christians who were excoriating me for the Garland event is to be heeded, Christians should make no public expression of their faith at all, and convert to Islam, so as to avoid mocking, provoking, and offending Muslims, and poking them in the eye.

And what it comes to it, that is most likely the exact thing that those Christians will do.

Seeking Allah Finding Jesus

In Seeking Allah, Finding Jesus, now expanded with bonus content, Nabeel Qureshi describes his dramatic journey from Islam to Christianity, complete with friendships, investigations, and supernatural dreams along the way.

Providing an intimate window into a loving Muslim home, Qureshi shares how he developed a passion for Islam before discovering, almost against his will, evidence that Jesus rose from the dead and claimed to be God. Unable to deny the arguments but not wanting to deny his family, Qureshi struggled with an inner turmoil that will challenge Christians, Muslims, and all those who are interested in the world’s greatest religions.

Engaging and thought-provoking, Seeking Allah, Finding Jesus tells a powerful story of the clash between Islam and Christianity in one man’s heart—and of the peace he eventually found in Jesus.

The New York Times bestselling Seeking Allah, Finding Jesus has been expanded to include:

A revised foreword and introduction
A substantially extended epilogue that shares how Nabeel told his friend David of his decision to follow Christ, how his parents found out, and much more
Expert contributions from scholars and ministry leaders on each section of the book, contributions previously included only in the ebook edition
An appendix with a topical table of contents (for teaching from Seeking Allah, Finding Jesus)
An appendix tackling the objection that Ahmadi Muslims are not true Muslims
And a sneak peek prologue from Nabeel’s forthcoming new book, No God but One: Allah or Jesus?
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